Monthly Archives: May 2013

A decrepit English girl in the Bangalore marathon

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So rather than starting from where I left off after another extended absence, I’m instead going to fill you in on recent events. 

Today I ran in the Bangalore 10K Marathon with the other SICHREM staff and volunteers, though we participated in the unfit people’s version called the Majja Run – just under 6km. Despite the relatively short distance, and the early start time of 8:30, it was still so swelteringly humid that repeated bottle tipping onto my own head barely staved off heat exhaustion. However, Sowmini (a fellow volunteer, and now my steadfast friend) and I did still run in stops and starts, with a dramatic sprint finish to full paparazzi and random onlookers. 

Extremely pleased with ourselves, we sat down to a celebratory (and complimentary) pack of apple, biscuits, and plain bun(?) to recover. I’m impressed that I even managed to run at all, though my knees have been giving me the horrible feeling that tomorrow will be the time to suffer.

Before the race itself, we entered into the costume competition. Never one to pass up the opportunity to don fancy dress, I’d suggested that we gather the required 10 people to attire themselves along a certain theme, and aim for the 75,000 rupee prize. A week after the idea sprouted, several trips to Shivaji Bazaar, and two frantic days of glueing, sticking, papier mache-ing, and painting later, we emerged as the ‘Human Rights Defenders a.k.a. Avengers’. Each character had their slogan sign – “Right to Life”, or “Right to Education” – and looked pretty stunning up on stage at 7:30 in the morning.

Though we had an illicit DC member in the gang – Superwoman – we stuck to the Marvel Universe overall, with Silver Surfer, Wolverine, Black Widow, Hawkeye, Nick Fury, Hulk, Captain America (that plaster of paris shield look fantastic!), Loki and Thor, whom I played. The biggest compliment I received was from a little boy no more than six, who came up to me in the street when I was already wearing full helmet, armour, and cape, and asked, “Are you Thor!?” 😀

Now I’m just sitting at home nursing my aching calves, and waiting to hear the results. 

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Invite: Breaking the Binary: Release, Sharing and Discussion of the report

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Yesterday, I attended this meeting with LABIA – a queer feminist women’s group, who were releasing their new report on Persons Assigned Gender Female at Birth (PAGFB), and their lived experiences across Indian cities.

An extremely interesting study, a copy of which I of course purchased, presented yesterday through a series of case studies and quotations. I enjoyed listening to their explanations for the empirical methods chosen – for example taking their sample from first wanting to cover individuals not conforming to gender-normative expression, to individuals assigned gender female at birth, thus ensuring that persons self-identifying as ‘men’, ‘women’ and ‘other’ were included from a wider angle.

My notes from yesterday’s Bangalore release and discussion of the report can be read here: Breaking the Binary.

 

LABIA’s summary:

Breaking The Binary (2013) is a study by LABIA – A Queer Feminist LBT Collective. Based on a research initiative that began in 2009, its findings question and challenge many of our fairly basic assumptions about gender, sexuality and sex. That sounds alarming – but only until we realise that this questioning of rigid norms leads to more and more ease that allows people to live and breathe in their own skins rather than suffocate inside somebody else’s impossible boxes.

The sub-title of the study is Understanding concerns and realities of queer persons assigned gender female at birth across a spectrum of lived gender identities and yes, that’s a mouthful. A mind-tingling thought-provoking mouthful of words, which the authors are at some pains to explain and elaborate in their report – and at its release in 6 cities between 27 April and 11 May 2013. For now, suffice it to nrmsay that for this study we spoke to 50 people across the country, and it is their voices and stories that we bring to you, accompanied by our own understanding and analysis.

Through this study, we explore the circumstances of queer PAGFB who are made to, or expected to, fit into society’s norms around gender and sexuality. We look at their experiences with natal families and in school; we chart their journeys through intimate relationships and jobs; we attempt to understand what happens to them in public spaces, and how they are treated by various state agencies; we discover where they seek and find support, community, and a refuge from the violence and discrimination that mark far too many lives.

Most significantly, this research has given us new insights into gender itself, which we feel are crucial additions to the current discourse in both queer and feminist spaces. Finally, the study flags areas of particular concern, and highlights some necessary interventions.

We ourselves are amazed at the richness and complexity of our findings and are impelled by the need to share these as widely as possible with all queer and feminist groups and individuals, activists and academics, all people working specifically with LBT persons as well as broadly in the areas of gender and sexuality — and of course all of us who are interested in knowing more about our selves.

https://sites.google.com/site/labiacollective/we-do/research